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Can I get a witness? : reading Revelation through African American culture Preview this item
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Can I get a witness? : reading Revelation through African American culture

Author: Brian K Blount
Publisher: Louisville, Ky. : Westminster John Knox Press, ©2005.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English : First editionView all editions and formats
Summary:
"In this study, Brian Blount reads the book of Revelation through the lens of African American culture, drawing correspondences between Revelation's context and the longstanding suffering of African Americans. Applying the African American social, political, and religious experience as an interpretive cipher for the book's complicated imagery, he contends that Revelation is essentially a story of suffering and  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Blount, Brian K., 1956-
Can I get a witness?
(DLC) 2004054949
(OCoLC)56057983
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Brian K Blount
ISBN: 9781611642254 1611642256
OCLC Number: 905544021
Description: 1 online resource (xii, 155 pages)
Contents: The revelation of culture --
Can I get a witness? An apocalyptic call for active resistance --
Wreaking weakness : the way of the lamb --
The rap against Rome : the spiritual-blues impulse and the hymns of revelation.
Responsibility: Brian K. Blount.

Abstract:

"In this study, Brian Blount reads the book of Revelation through the lens of African American culture, drawing correspondences between Revelation's context and the longstanding suffering of African Americans. Applying the African American social, political, and religious experience as an interpretive cipher for the book's complicated imagery, he contends that Revelation is essentially a story of suffering and struggle amidst oppressive assimilation and that witnessing was the ethic by which John wished people to live."--Jacket.
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